Gold News

Inflation & Prices

A short note on the Consumer Price index...

SURELY the greatest marketing coup of the twentieth century – besides making cigarettes taste of freedom and youth rather than the Sandakan death-march – was kidding the world that "inflation" meant rising prices.

   Long mistaking symptom for cause, what hope do we have of defending our money today?

   "The word 'inflation' originally applied solely to the quantity of money," as Henry Hazlitt, sometime Newsweek and New York Times editor, put it in 1965. "It meant that the volume of money was inflated, blown up, overextended.

   "To use the word 'inflation' to mean 'a rise in prices' is to deflect attention away from the real cause of inflation and the real cure for it."

   In short, words matter – and not least when people try to save and plan for the future. Because our drive to label the world dictates our response to it. Use the wrong label, and you're sure to screw up both your understanding and your reactions from there.

   "Over the past 100 years the retail market has changed tremendously," notes Alan Kackmeister in a recent paper for the Journal of Money, Credit & Banking. "Transportation is easier. Stores are larger and less personal. Product brands have become more important. Food and other necessities make up a smaller share of consumption expenditures."

   To this list of cost-cutting advances, Kackmeister could have added no end of technological and cut-price progress – mechanized and robot production, chemical fertilizers, those two billion people pulling down wage-costs after the Iron Curtain and Great Wall of China both fell to the globalized market...

   Yet despite all these advances in making everyday stuff, what's now called "the cost of living" has barely ever failed to stop rising. The official Consumer Price Index in the United States has risen 11 times over in the last 90 years. Here in Britain, one pound now buys less than 3% what it did in terms of "making ends meet".

   Good job we've got so many more Dollars and Pounds to help pay for things, right?

Adrian Ash is director of research at BullionVault, the world-leading physical gold, silver and platinum market for private investors online. Formerly head of editorial at London's top publisher of private-investment advice, he was City correspondent for The Daily Reckoning from 2003 to 2008, and he has now been researching and writing daily analysis of precious metals and the wider financial markets for over 20 years. A frequent guest on BBC radio and television, Adrian is regularly quoted by the Financial Times, MarketWatch and many other respected news outlets, and his views from inside the bullion market have been sought by the Economist magazine, CNBC, Bloomberg, Germany's Handelsblatt and FAZ, plus Italy's Il Sole 24 Ore.

See the full archive of Adrian Ash articles on GoldNews.

Please Note: All articles published here are to inform your thinking, not lead it. Only you can decide the best place for your money, and any decision you make will put your money at risk. Information or data included here may have already been overtaken by events – and must be verified elsewhere – should you choose to act on it. Please review our Terms & Conditions for accessing Gold News.

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